DOWNLOAD THE PDF LIST HERE WSPER legacy projects 11.08.21

Project name:

Bjorgen Cr at Lemolo Shore

Drive NE Culvert

PRISM Number(s) (if known):

Submitting Lead Entity:

WSPER

Project Sponsor (if known):

Kitsap County Public

Works

Submitted by:

Joe Rutan, PE

Email:

[email protected]

BRIEF Overall Project Summary and location description:

Replace fish barrier 36-inch culvert conveying Bjorgen Creek beneath Lemolo Shore Drive NE with a fish passable structure.

Does this project address a high priority barrier to salmon recovery? If so, please point to where this priority is identified and link to the priorities identified in your local or regional salmon recovery chapter or support for a species of tribal significance.

WDFW list this culvert as a 100% blockage for salmon. This Lemolo Shore Drive NE barrier location to be removed for Bjorgen Creek will open 2024 meters of habitat for Coho, Chum, Searun Cutthroat and resident Trout. By removing this barrier Salmon from NE SI KA Bay will be able to access Bjorgen Creek. Total passage summary report at http://apps.wdfw.wa.gov/fishpassagephotos/Reports/991879_Report.pdf

Does this project exceed the cost of a typical PSAR large cap project request? What is the estimated total cost of the project?

Overall project cost approximately $1,000,000.

What are the additional (non-salmon) benefits of this project? (Climate resilience, DEI issues, Public access/recreation, employment opportunities, etc.)

This culvert is in poor condition and must be replaced to continue to support the road above it. Lemolo Shore Drive NE supports walkers, bikers and boaters. Lemolo Shore Drive NE is one of the few East-West Arterials in Kitsap County which serves the Port Madison Indian Reservation.

Are there (or could there be) other organizations or individuals that support the project primarily for the non- salmon benefits described above?

Suquamish Tribe/road users

Is there an identified project sponsor? If so, who is it? If not, who or what entity might be a likely candidate?

Kitsap County Public Works

What stage is the project in? (Feasibility? Design? Acquisition? Construction?)

Design 2023, Acquisition 2023, Construction 2024

Puget Sound Mega Projects List July 29, 2021

Page 2

How much funding is needed for each phase of work?

Construction Funding of $1,000,000 requested

Is there an existing strategy for securing funding for this work?

Seek grant sources to accomplish

Is the project ready to proceed with the next phase of work?

Yes

If funding is in hand, what is the timeframe for implementation?

Construction in 2024

Are there factors that make this project particularly time-sensitive?

This culvert is the only blockage to upstream to Bjorgen Creek from NE SI KA Bay. Other culvert locations within the City of Poulsbo and WSDOT barriers have been corrected. By correcting this location it opens over a mile of habitat for salmon spawning.

Other relevant information:

Puget Sound Partnership

Legacy Project Portfolio Call for Projects Project Information Form

Project name:

Blakely Harbor shoreline

restoration

PRISM Number(s) (if known):

Submitting Lead Entity:

WSPER

Project Sponsor (if known):

BILT/BI parks?

Submitted by:

K peters

Email: [email protected]

BRIEF Overall Project Summary and location description:

To be filled out later

Does this project address a high priority barrier to salmon recovery? If so, please point to where this priority is identified and link to the priorities identified in your local or regional salmon recovery chapter or support for a species of tribal significance.

Does this project exceed the cost of a typical PSAR large cap project request? What is the estimated total cost of the project?

What are the additional (non-salmon) benefits of this project? (Climate resilience, DEI issues, Public access/recreation, employment opportunities, etc.)

Are there (or could there be) other organizations or individuals that support the project primarily for the non- salmon benefits described above?

Is there an identified project sponsor? If so, who is it? If not, who or what entity might be a likely candidate? What stage is the project in? (Feasibility? Design? Acquisition? Construction?)

How much funding is needed for each phase of work?

Is there an existing strategy for securing funding for this work? Is the project ready to proceed with the next phase of work?

If funding is in hand, what is the timeframe for implementation? Are there factors that make this project particularly time-sensitive? Other relevant information:

Puget Sound Partnership

Legacy Project Portfolio Call for Projects Project Information Form

Project name:

Bucklin Hill/ Tracyton Regional Stormwater Facility

PRISM Number(s) (if known):

Submitting Lead Entity:

Project Sponsor (if known):

Kitsap County Public

Works

Submitted by:

Michelle Perdue

Email:

[email protected]

BRIEF Overall Project Summary and location description:

The proposed Bucklin Hill/ Tracyton Regional Stormwater Facility is a 0.8-acre Kitsap County-owned site located within the Silverdale Urban Growth Area (UGA), which is also the regional center. It is at the intersection of two major arterial roads, Bucklin Hill Road and Tracyton Boulevard. The proposed site is located at a lower elevation in the contributing basin, which allows treatment of a 72.5-acre fully developed urban basin. This includes high ADT County roads, commercial development and high-density residential development. The proposed facility will discharge to an existing conveyance system that navigates the Clear Creek estuary and outfalls into Dyes Inlet. (Figure 3)

The site is located within the most densely developed area of unincorporated Kitsap County and experiences higher levels of stormwater runoff due to the amount of impervious surface. In addition, the basin has had minimal conveyance modifications to date, it discharges to a navigable waterbody of the state, and there are no critical area impacts. For these reasons, this project is well suited to receive the proposed stormwater improvements.

The site also includes attractive features – location, view, size and accessibility – that make it particularly suited for a multipurpose regional stormwater treatment facility. Design could incorporate community amenities such as pedestrian paths connecting to adjacent sidewalks, educational signage, covered shelters and open landscaped green spaces, as well as the benefits of stormwater treatment. Overall, the project has excellent potential for benefits that span environmental, recreational, and social criteria. It provides an opportunity to build upon successful retrofit projects already completed within the watershed. This will continue to improve water quality and ecosystem habitat to Clear Creek, Dyes Inlet and Puget Sound.

Does this project address a high priority barrier to salmon recovery? If so, please point to where this priority is identified and link to the priorities identified in your local or regional salmon recovery chapter or support for a species of tribal significance.

The proposed facility would discharge to the Clear Creek estuary and Dyes Inlet. Clear Creek is one of the most productive salmon streams in Kitsap County and supports multiple salmonid species including threatened chinook salmon and winter steelhead. (Figure 6) The project would provide

important protection of this priority habitat, including reduction of toxics loading from high ADT roads that are presumed to contribute to coho pre-spawn mortality. This regional stormwater treatment facility would be expected to provide significant salmon recovery benefits.

In addition to salmon recovery, the Clear Creek estuary and Dyes Inlet support a wide variety of beneficial uses that are extremely vulnerable to stormwater impacts. These uses include commercial and recreational shellfish harvest, aquatic recreation, and spawning habitat for all three species of forage fish

– smelt, sand lance, and herring.

Pollutant loading to these bodies of water has historically been relatively high. Dyes Inlet is subject to a TMDL for bacteria and is listed for a variety of conventional and toxic contaminants in both water and sediment. Due to the combination of high beneficial uses and stormwater threats, the Draft Kitsap County Stormwater Management Action Plan (SMAP) identified the East Dyes Inlet watershed, which includes the proposed stormwater park site, as the top priority County-wide for stormwater retrofits.

Does this project exceed the cost of a typical PSAR large cap project request? What is the estimated total cost of the project?

Yes – $3.24 million

What are the additional (non-salmon) benefits of this project? (Climate resilience, DEI issues, Public access/recreation, employment opportunities, etc.)

  • The project supports and implements several significant goals and policies of the Kitsap County Comprehensive Plan (2016) and Silverdale Design Standards (2016). These plans were developed with significant community input, as well as the County’s Water as a Resource Policy. The project proposal aligns with Silverdale Regional Growth Center goals from the above plans in the following ways:
    • Include urban environment into streetscape designs to support various uses
    • Consider health and equity impacts on vulnerable populations when locating facilities
    • Coordinate stormwater treatment as part of a larger regional system
    • Expand and improve the parks system
    • Integrate natural features and views into site design
    • Promote pedestrian oriented, high-quality urban developmentSimilarly, the Silverdale Design Standards (2016) are founded on preserving and enhancing the following elements, all of which this project proposal address:
    • Improve community gathering spaces such that they provide a sense of place and anchor citizens within their community
    • Incorporate safe, distinctive, and well-designed public facilities
    • Enhance the beauty and walkability of Silverdale by expanding parks and scenic spaces
    • Build community character by developing amenities that include parks, landscaping and public art
    • Preserve and protect Silverdale’s high-quality natural environment by conserving habitat and maintaining water qualityBeyond the principal justification of this project proposal – to provide stormwater treatment – other elements will be incorporated into design that allow us to create holistic improvements to the community so as to fulfill other important criteria outlined in the above goals and policies. Such elements could include infrastructure for pedestrian activity and gathering, open space, environmental educational infrastructure, and public art features. Preservation or inclusion of trees and native vegetation in the design could allow for multiple opportunities such as education, improving ecological health, offsetting urban heat island effects and additional climate resilience benefits.
  • This project proposal provides opportunities to advance diversity, equity and inclusion and improve equitable recreational access for overburdened communities. The park is located in the most diverse area of unincorporated Kitsap County. It is within a one-mile radius of 5 of the top 8 most diverse census tracts in unincorporated Kitsap County, and within a two-mile radius of all 8 most diverse census tracts. Demographics of the areas immediately adjacent to the site are below (US Census data, 2020) (Figure 7):
    • 35% Non-White
    • 25% Children Below Poverty Line
    • 14% Population Below Poverty LineThe site provides excellent connectivity to adjacent neighborhoods and the non-motorized system. It is highly visible from two bordering arterials – both of which support pedestrians – and situated at the intersection of two regionally-designated bike routes. The site abuts a well-traveled route that connects the high-density residential area to commercial areas, and other existing recreational opportunities are relatively distant in comparison. This greater accessibility benefits the more diverseand lower-income populations that are located near the stormwater park, as well as others.

      Are there (or could there be) other organizations or individuals that support the project primarily for the non- salmon benefits described above?

      The following agencies have submitted letters of support for this project: Kitsap Conservation District, WSU Kitsap Extension, Kitsap Public Health District, and the Kitsap Regional Library. The neighborhoods in the immediate vicinity of the project, as well as the larger community of Silverdale, will benefit from a healthier watershed, estuary, and marine environment and the community amenities provided by a new multiuse facility.

      Is there an identified project sponsor? If so, who is it? If not, who or what entity might be a likely candidate?

      Yes. Kitsap County Public Works – Stormwater Division is sponsoring this project.

      What stage is the project in? (Feasibility? Design? Acquisition? Construction?)

      This project is in the feasibility stage, including preliminary monitoring. Once feasibility assessment is complete, the project will move into the next phases – environmental assessment, design, permitting and construction.

      How much funding is needed for each phase of work?

  • Feasibility $40,000
  • Design $250,000
  • Property reimbursement $750,000
  • Construction $2,500,000

Is there an existing strategy for securing funding for this work?

Yes. Project is on the 2022-2027 Kitsap County Public Works Stormwater Capital Facilities Plan in the above listed amounts. Projected funding is from the County specified stormwater construction fund as well as potential grant funding sources such as PSRC and the Department of Ecology. County staff have applied for PSRC grant funding to cover the feasibility phase and are awaiting determination.

Is the project ready to proceed with the next phase of work?

Yes.

If funding is in hand, what is the timeframe for implementation?

If PSRC funding is secured, feasibility review will begin in 2022. The project is scheduled for design in 2026 and construction in 2027. This identified schedule is based not only on funding, but on staff capacity and interdivisional County coordination.

Are there factors that make this project particularly time-sensitive?

No.

Other relevant information:

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Puget Sound Partnership

Legacy Project Portfolio Call for Projects Project Information Form

Project name:

Burley Cr at Bethel

Burley Road SE

PRISM Number(s) (if known):

Submitting Lead Entity:

WSPER

Project Sponsor (if known):

Kitsap County Public

Works

Submitted by:

Joe Rutan, PE

Email:

[email protected]

BRIEF Overall Project Summary and location description:

Replace fish barrier 2’x6’ concrete box culvert conveying Burley Creek beneath Bethel Burley Road with fish passable structure.

Does this project address a high priority barrier to salmon recovery? If so, please point to where this priority is identified and link to the priorities identified in your local or regional salmon recovery chapter or support for a species of tribal significance.

WDFW list this culvert as a 100% blockage for salmon. Total passage summary report at http://apps.wdfw.wa.gov/fishpassagephotos/Reports/15.0056%20%20%200.20_Report.pdf

Does this project exceed the cost of a typical PSAR large cap project request? What is the estimated total cost of the project?

Overall project cost approximately $3,600,000.

What are the additional (non-salmon) benefits of this project? (Climate resilience, DEI issues, Public access/recreation, employment opportunities, etc.)

This culvert is in poor condition and must be replaced to continue to support the road above it. Bethel Burley Road is a major access to Port Orchard and Purdy as well as one of the few North-South Arterials in Kitsap County.

Are there (or could there be) other organizations or individuals that support the project primarily for the non- salmon benefits described above?

Road users

Is there an identified project sponsor? If so, who is it? If not, who or what entity might be a likely candidate?

Kitsap County Public Works

What stage is the project in? (Feasibility? Design? Acquisition? Construction?)

Design 2023, Acquisition 2023, Construction 2024 How much funding is needed for each phase of work? Construction Funding of $3,600,000 requested

Page 2

Is there an existing strategy for securing funding for this work?

Seek grant sources to accomplish

Is the project ready to proceed with the next phase of work?

Yes

If funding is in hand, what is the timeframe for implementation?

Construction in 2024

Are there factors that make this project particularly time-sensitive?

This culvert blocks upstream portions of Burley Creek. By removing this barrier to salmon it will open miles of habitat.

Other relevant information:

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Puget Sound Partnership

Legacy Project Portfolio Call for Projects Project Information Form

Project name:

Carpenter Creek at

NE Barber Cut Off

PRISM Number(s) (if known):

Submitting Lead Entity:

WSPER

Project Sponsor (if known):

Kitsap County Public

Works

Submitted by:

Joe Rutan, PE

Email:

[email protected]

BRIEF Overall Project Summary and location description:

Replace fish barrier 54-inch culvert conveying Carpenter Creek beneath NE Barber Cut Off Road with fish passable structure.

Does this project address a high priority barrier to salmon recovery? If so, please point to where this priority is identified and link to the priorities identified in your local or regional salmon recovery chapter or support for a species of tribal significance.

WDFW list this culvert as a 100% blockage for salmon. Total passage summary report at http://apps.wdfw.wa.gov/fishpassagephotos/Reports/999736_Report.pdf

Does this project exceed the cost of a typical PSAR large cap project request? What is the estimated total cost of the project?

Overall project cost approximately $2,000,000.

What are the additional (non-salmon) benefits of this project? (Climate resilience, DEI issues, Public access/recreation, employment opportunities, etc.)

This culvert is in poor condition and must be replaced to continue to support the road above it. NE Barber Cut Off Road is a major access to Kingston as well as one of the few East-West routes in Kitsap County.

Are there (or could there be) other organizations or individuals that support the project primarily for the non- salmon benefits described above?

Road users

Is there an identified project sponsor? If so, who is it? If not, who or what entity might be a likely candidate?

Kitsap County Public Works

What stage is the project in? (Feasibility? Design? Acquisition? Construction?)

Design 2023, Acquisition 2023, Construction 2024 How much funding is needed for each phase of work? Construction Funding of $2,000,000 requested

Page 2

Is there an existing strategy for securing funding for this work?

Seek grant sources to accomplish

Is the project ready to proceed with the next phase of work?

Yes

If funding is in hand, what is the timeframe for implementation?

Construction in 2024

Are there factors that make this project particularly time-sensitive?

Deteriorating existing culvert. This culvert is a blockage to Apple Tree Cove and Puget Sound.

Other relevant information:

Puget Sound Partnership

Legacy Project Portfolio Call for Projects Project Information Form

Project name:

Chico Corridor floodplain

acquisitions

PRISM Number(s) (if known):

Submitting Lead Entity:

WSPER

Project Sponsor (if known):

Suquamish Tribe/GPC

Submitted by:

K peters

Email: [email protected]

BRIEF Overall Project Summary and location description:

To be filled out later

Does this project address a high priority barrier to salmon recovery? If so, please point to where this priority is identified and link to the priorities identified in your local or regional salmon recovery chapter or support for a species of tribal significance.

Does this project exceed the cost of a typical PSAR large cap project request? What is the estimated total cost of the project?

What are the additional (non-salmon) benefits of this project? (Climate resilience, DEI issues, Public access/recreation, employment opportunities, etc.)

Are there (or could there be) other organizations or individuals that support the project primarily for the non- salmon benefits described above?

Is there an identified project sponsor? If so, who is it? If not, who or what entity might be a likely candidate? What stage is the project in? (Feasibility? Design? Acquisition? Construction?)

How much funding is needed for each phase of work?

Is there an existing strategy for securing funding for this work? Is the project ready to proceed with the next phase of work?

If funding is in hand, what is the timeframe for implementation? Are there factors that make this project particularly time-sensitive? Other relevant information:

Puget Sound Partnership

Legacy Project Portfolio Call for Projects Project Information Form

Project name:

Duncan/ Colchester

PRISM Number(s) (if known):

Submitting Lead Entity:

Project Sponsor (if known):

Kitsap County Public Works

Submitted by:

Michelle Perdue

Email:

[email protected]

BRIEF Overall Project Summary and location description:

Duncan Creek is located in unincorporated Kitsap County, approximately 0.1 miles south of the Manchester village, and discharges into Puget Sound (Figure 1). In total, Duncan Creek drains approximately 280 acres located to the west and south. A majority of the basin is occupied by single family residential development, and large forested ravines and the main forested creek valley make up the remainder of the sub-basin. Much of the residential development sits within the west of Alaska Ave between E Alder Street and E Harrison Street. This total potential contributing sub-basin directly prior to the outfall is 21-acres (Figure 2). Duncan Creek passes under Colchester Drive south at the intersection of Hemlock Street and is conveyed through a 250-foot long, 36-inch diameter pipe system. This system conveys the creek flow eastward through a 125-foot culvert section, 36-inches in diameter.

From here, it passes toward the south through a 125-foot long conveyance pipe where it converges at a manhole before daylighting another 400-foot distance toward the shoreline into Puget Sound. Most of this open channel span at the end of it run is through one private parcel. It is constrained on either side by some smaller bridges, and other structures. In recent years, this open channel section has swelled during the rainy season and caused flooding (Figure 3).

In addition, the current stormwater detention system has been mapped by WDFW as a complete fish blockage, because of its length and restricted pipe size compared to the bank full width of the creek. Recognizing this blockage – in addition to the need for retiring older components of the stormwater drainage system – the County is interested in replacing these structures with a WDFW-approved, fish-passable culvert that will still allow Duncan Creek to appropriately pass under Colchester Drive.

For these dual reasons – flow control and removal of a fish barrier – this project is a high priority for Kitsap County. There have already been conceptual plans done on both fronts and a 30% design for the highwater bypass. To address flow control and reducing the occurrence of flooding, a report was conducted by Struck Environmental, Inc in 2019 to analyze three alternatives. The selected option from that report involves installation of a flow splitter at the manhole to the east of Colchester to allow heavy flows to pass through a bypass structure and be conveyed along Hemlock Street. Two water quality systems would provide enhanced treatment before being discharged on the shoreline through a bubbler. In addition to this analysis, a 30% design has been drafted.

An analysis and conceptual design were prepared by NHC in 12/2017 to address the fish barrier culvert. It evaluated three different options for conveying flow in a manner that would allow for fish passage. Of the options studied, the preferred option involved pushing a 10-foot diameter pipe under Colchester Drive to open and straighten the flow. A conceptual design plan was drafted up from this analysis (Figure 4).

Remaining needs for Phase 1 of this two-phased project are to finalize design plans and secure permits.

Does this project address a high priority barrier to salmon recovery? If so, please point to where this priority is identified and link to the priorities identified in your local or regional salmon recovery chapter or support for a species of tribal significance.

This project addresses removing a WDFW-defined fish barrier along Duncan Creek. A fish barrier analysis to determine its priority is currently being conducted by WDFW.

Does this project exceed the cost of a typical PSAR large cap project request? What is the estimated total cost of the project?

Design for this project, budgeted at $500,000, will not exceed the cost of a typical PSAR large cap project request. Construction costs in Phase 1 and Phase 2 (budgeted at $2.3 million) will exceed the cost of a typical PSAR large cap project request, including construction of both the fish barrier removal and high flow bypass structure.

What are the additional (non-salmon) benefits of this project? (Climate resilience, DEI issues, Public access/recreation, employment opportunities, etc.)

This project has direct impacts on improving livelihood for various salmon populations, providing security against flooding for a dozen parcels adjacent to the creek, heightened security against climate change impacts that are anticipated to affect this region, employment opportunities, and strengthening ecosystem diversity.

There is one parcel directly impacted the heaviest by current frequent flooding at the open channeled portion of Duncan Creek. In addition, there are a dozen other parcels affected when analyzing upstream flooding impacts. When flooding occurs, the creek backs up on the west side of Colchester Road at the Hemlock intersection. The flooding frequently threatens to overtop the roadway which is detrimental to public throughfare, as well as the integrity of the bank along the roadway. These saturated conditions will also encourage scouring, and sediment transport at the confluence of Puget Sound and exacerbated flooding issues to adjacent parcels along the creek bed. These flooding issues will only continue to become more frequent as climate change bring with it a high frequency of large storm events and increased sea level rise. A straight culvert under Colchester with a heavy-flow bypass system would ensure water is being appropriately diverted and discharged without surging the system which would avoid flooding concerns.

This dual-phased project would not only improve the living condition of salmon and humans but would provide employment opportunities. This project would require engineering, contractors, inspectors, and various professional disciplines all in coordination. This can be anticipated to span the three-year duration of this project, and additional years to come for continued maintenance.

Removing this fish barrier would also improve ecosystem diversity for miles upstream of the current barrier. This will strengthen the various existing wildlife – beyond just salmon – and native plants in and around the creek bed. Additionally, it will be supported by The Committee to Restore Duncan Creek, the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, and WDFW.

Are there (or could there be) other organizations or individuals that support the project primarily for the non- salmon benefits described above?

Yes. The Conservation District, Manchester Community Association Council, and the entities listed above would potentially support this project.

Is there an identified project sponsor? If so, who is it? If not, who or what entity might be a likely candidate?

The project sponsor is Kitsap County Public Works – Stormwater Division.

What stage is the project in? (Feasibility? Design? Acquisition? Construction?)

This project is currently in the design stage. This stage will require finalizing design concept, securing funding, permits, holding public meetings, and coordinating with other professionals.

How much funding is needed for each phase of work?

  • Design and permitting requires $500,000 and is scheduled to take one year.
  • Phase 1 (Colchester improvements) requires $1.3 million and is scheduled to take one year.
  • Phase 2 (Duncan Creek culvert replacement) requires $1 million and is scheduled to take one year.

Is there an existing strategy for securing funding for this work?

The current plan is to identify and apply to different grant sources such as PSAR, Ecology, and PSRC. Any funding streams secured in this manner could offset the funds that will be contributed by Kitsap County Stormwater Division.

Is the project ready to proceed with the next phase of work?

Analysis studies have been conducted from which an idealized concept has been identified, and the project is on the current 2022-2027 6-year Stormwater Capital Facilities Plan for Kitsap County Public Works. Plans have been started for the flow splitter design down Hemlock, however plans are only in the concept phase for the culvert installation project. With the analysis studies complete and conversations with the public, pushing these designs through finalization will be the next step.

If funding is in hand, what is the timeframe for implementation?

Funding is not currently in hand. We will be searching for funding until it is secured. When secured, the timeline to complete design and construction will be a total of three years. The 2022-2027 Stormwater CFP currently lists this project in 2024-2026.

Are there factors that make this project particularly time-sensitive?

Aside from flooding issues becoming more frequent in this area, Kitsap County anticipates high priority projects up to 5 years prior to starting work on them. This allows the various Public Works Divisions to plan for collaboration. Without this collaboration, projects would be stuck in gridlock and would not advance in a timely manner.

Other relevant information:

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Figure 1. Location of Duncan Creek is seen with marker labeled “A” adjacent to Manchester village.

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Figure 2. Contributing basins that discharge to Duncan Creek.

the Duncan Creek fish barrier, above.

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Figure 3. Current fish barrier in Duncan Creek.

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Figure 4. Image from NHC analysis report illustrating the best option design for removing the Duncan Creek fish barrier.

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STATE OF WASHINGTON

Puget Sound Partnership

Legacy Project Portfolio Call for Projects Project Information Form

Project name:

Tracyton Green Streets Stormwater Retrofit Project

PRISM

Number(s) (if

known):

Submitting Lead Entity:

Kitsap County Public Works

Project Sponsor (if known):

Kitsap County

Submitted by:

Michelle Perdue

Email:

[email protected]

BRIEF Overall Project Summary and location description:

The Tracyton Green Street Stormwater Retrofit Project would improve water quality and drainage facilities where currently there are none. Under current site conditions, runoff for this drainage basin discharges untreated directly into Dyes Inlet. The project is located within the densely developed neighborhood of Tracyton in unincorporated Kitsap County (Figure 1). The proposed improvements – bioretention cells, proprietary treatment devices, a water quality vault – would be situated within the fully developed 84-acre Tracyton drainage basin (Figure 2). The area has had minimal conveyance modifications, stormwater currently directly discharges to navigable waters of the state without treatment, there are no critical area impacts in the site, and appropriate site topography is present. For these reasons, this is a suitable site for a water quality treatment project.

Does this project address a high priority barrier to salmon recovery? If so, please point to where this priority is identified and link to the priorities identified in your local or regional salmon recovery chapter or support for a species of tribal significance.

The proposed facility would discharge to Dyes Inlet, which is a navigable waterway of the state. Pollutant loading to this water body historically has been relatively high.  Dyes Inlet is subject to a Total Maximum Daily Limit (TMDL) for bacteria and is listed for a variety of conventional and toxic contaminants in both water and sediment.   Due to the combination of high beneficial uses and stormwater threats, the Draft Kitsap County Stormwater Management Action Plan (SMAP) identified the East Dyes Inlet watershed – which includes the proposed Tracyton neighborhood – as a top priority for County-wide stormwater retrofits.

Does this project exceed the cost of a typical PSAR large cap project request? What is the estimated total cost of the project?

This project does not exceed the cost of a typical PSAR large cap project request. The estimated total project cost is $2.5 million to $4.5 million.

What are the additional (non-salmon) benefits of this project? (Climate resilience, DEI issues, Public access/recreation, employment opportunities, etc.)

The project supports and implements several significant goals and policies of the Kitsap County Comprehensive Plan (2016) and Silverdale Design Standards (2016) which were developed with significant community input, as well as the County’s Water as a Resource Policy.   The project proposal advances these goals and policies listed in the Silverdale Regional Growth Center:

  • Include urban environment into streetscape design to supports various uses

  • Consider health and equity impacts on vulnerable populations when locating facilities

  • Coordinate stormwater treatment as part of a larger regional system

  • Promote pedestrian oriented and high-quality urban development

  • Improve community gathering spaces such that they provide a sense of place and anchor citizens within their community

  • Incorporate safe, distinctive, and well-designed public facilities

  • Build community character by developing amenities that include parks, landscaping and public art

  • Preserve and protect Tracyton’s high-quality natural environment by conserving habitat and maintaining water quality

Beyond the principal aim of this focus – to provide stormwater treatment – other elements will be incorporated into design that allows us to create holistic improvements to the community so as to fulfill other important criteria outlined in the above goals and policies. Such elements could include: infrastructure for pedestrian activity and gathering, open spaces, interpretive signage, and public art features.  Preservation or inclusion of trees and native vegetation in the

design could allow for multiple opportunities such as education, improving ecological health, offsetting urban heat island effects, and additional climate resiliency benefits.

Are there (or could there be) other organizations or individuals that support the project primarily for the non-salmon benefits described above?

Yes. The Kitsap Conservation District and WDFW would support this project because it promotes a healthier marine environment and enhances community amenities.

Is there an identified project sponsor? If so, who is it? If not, who or what entity might be a likely candidate?

Kitsap County Public Works – Stormwater Division is the project sponsor.

What stage is the project in? (Feasibility? Design? Acquisition?

This project is in the feasibility stage, including preliminary monitoring. Once feasibility assessment is complete, the project will move into the next phases – environmental assessment, property acquisition (if needed), design, permitting and construction.

How much funding is needed for each phase of work?

Phase 1 is slated for $500,000 and is for feasibility and design. Phase 2 has $1.5 million programed for construction.

Is there an existing strategy for securing funding for this work?

Yes. This project is included on the 2022-2027 Kitsap County Public Works Stormwater Capital Facilities Plan in the above listed amounts with projected funding from the stormwater

construction fund as well as from potential grant funding sources (PSRC, Department of Ecology). If funding is secured, feasibility review will begin in 2024.

Is the project ready to proceed with the next phase of work?

This project has received a thorough comprehensive study analysis conducted by Robin Kirschbaum, RKI Planning Engineering, in the East Bremerton and East Port Orchard Stormwater Retrofit Study dated May, 2019. Additionally, it has been on the Kitsap County Capital Facilities Plan list with anticipated and budgeted funds to begin when grant funding is procured.

If funding is in hand, what is the timeframe for implementation?

No, funding is not in hand. Kitsap County’s Capital Facilities Plan has identified $500,000 in 2024 and $1.5 million in 2025 for preliminary and final engineering.

Are there factors that make this project particularly time-sensitive?

No.

Other relevant information:

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Figure 1. Tracyton neighborhood – situated in the Urban Growth Area (green) and just outside the Bremerton Urban Growth Area (purple). Image from the East Bremerton and East Port Orchard Stormwater Retrofit Study.

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Figure 2. Tracyton Subbasin Delineation map – Includes contributing stormwater basins to the proposed stormwater treatment project. Image from the East Bremerton and East Port Orchard Stormwater Retrofit Study.

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Puget Sound Partnership

Legacy Project Portfolio Call for Projects Project Information Form

Project name:

Harper Estuary Culvert Removal

and Bridge

PRISM Number(s) (if known):

20-1608

Submitting Lead Entity:

WSPER

Project Sponsor (if known):

Kitsap County

Submitted by:

Christina Kereki

Email:

[email protected]

BRIEF Overall Project Summary and location description:

Harper Estuary is a small but significant pocket estuary with salt marsh fringe, mud flats and small freshwater streams, surrounded by lowland forests. The estuary is in south Kitsap, northwest of Southworth. The estuary is bisected by SE Olympiad Drive and tidal exchange is limited by a 36-inch diameter culvert . Kitsap County proposes to remove the 33% passable culvert on SE Olympiad Drive where it bisects Harper Estuary and replace it with a 120-foot bridge to allow full tidal exchange and unimpeded fish passage. This restoration project also includes removing road fill and associated shoreline armor, building a pedestrian pathway and upgrading associated stormwater treatment. This project will restore tidal habitat connectivity to intertidal habitat important

for juvenile salmonid rearing including Puget Sound Chinook, restore habitat processes and allow unimpeded fish access to estuarine and stream habitat upstream of the barrier.

Does this project address a high priority barrier to salmon recovery? If so, please point to where this priority is identified and link to the priorities identified in your local or regional salmon recovery chapter or support for a species of tribal significance.

This project in the Harper Creek watershed is identified as a priority action that aligns with local and regional recovery strategies. The project is identified as a priority near term action in the current Puget Sound Action AgendaThe West Sound Nearshore Integration and Synthesis Report identified the project as a tier one, high priority. The West Sound Partners for Ecosystem Recovery Lead Entity recognize the project as an important nearshore restoration project. It was also identified in the Puget Sound Nearshore Ecosystem Project in 2002 by the US Army Corps of Engineers and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife as a high priority. Both the East Kitsap Chapter and the Nearshore Chapter of the Puget Sound Salmon Recovery Plan (NOAA, 2007) highlight nearshore actions such as estuarine and fish passage restoration. The project was ranked within the top five restoration actions for Chinook salmon recovery within the East Kitsap Chapter of the Puget Sound Salmon Recovery Plan (NOAA, 2007).

Does this project exceed the cost of a typical PSAR large cap project request? What is the estimated total cost of the project?

Yes, this project exceeds a PSAR large cap request. The estimated total cost is $5-7 million.

What are the additional (non-salmon) benefits of this project? (Climate resilience, DEI issues, Public access/recreation, employment opportunities, etc.)

The bridge project is designed to be climate resilient with a large span of 120 feet and with its support pillars outside of the restored channel and above the mean higher high water (MHHW) elevation. The roadway will also be raised 8 feet at the highest point to provide sufficient clearance above the base flood elevation. The current roadway floods during winter storms and King tides, causing problems with passability and stormwater pollution. As such, the project will also upgrade the public safety and passability of roadway for vehicle traffic and control

stormwater runoff. Pedestrian safety will also be increased with a designated pedestrian pathway. Public access and recreational opportunities will also be enhanced with a formal hand-launch for boats on the south side of the new bridge.

Are there (or could there be) other organizations or individuals that support the project primarily for the non- salmon benefits described above?

-The community

-Friends of Harper Pier

-Harper Stewardship Group

Is there an identified project sponsor? If so, who is it? If not, who or what entity might be a likely candidate?

Yes, there is an identified project sponsor: Kitsap County, Public Works.

What stage is the project in? (Feasibility? Design? Acquisition? Construction?)

The bridge design is 99% complete. Permitting is 90% complete. The project is currently in the process of securing the lease for the DNR State Owned Aquatic Lands (SOAL) on which the future bridge and roadway is located. Then the next step is construction.

How much funding is needed for each phase of work?

Phases:

  1. AA&E: $500k-1 million
  2. Construction: $5-6 million

Is there an existing strategy for securing funding for this work?

The strategy includes pursuing all state and federal grant opportunities. However, there is no current funding in hand.

Is the project ready to proceed with the next phase of work?

Yes.

If funding is in hand, what is the timeframe for implementation?

The total implementation time frame is 33-36 months.

Are there factors that make this project particularly time-sensitive?

We have been trying to fund this designed project for the last 6 years. State and Federal permits are expiring in 2022 and 2023, respectively.

Other relevant information: See photos to follow.

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Aerial view of SE Olympiad Dr. bisecting Harper Estuary. The entire tidal flow is funneled through a 36 inch culvert.

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Same south-east view with interpretive signs in place.

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North view out into the bay.

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Legacy Project Portfolio Call for Projects Project Information Form

Project name:

Kitsap Creek at

Northlake Way

PRISM Number(s) (if known):

18-1838

Submitting Lead Entity:

WSPER

Project Sponsor (if known):

City of Bremerton

Submitted by:

K peters

Email: [email protected]

BRIEF Overall Project Summary and location description:

To be filled out later

Does this project address a high priority barrier to salmon recovery? If so, please point to where this priority is identified and link to the priorities identified in your local or regional salmon recovery chapter or support for a species of tribal significance.

Does this project exceed the cost of a typical PSAR large cap project request? What is the estimated total cost of the project?

What are the additional (non-salmon) benefits of this project? (Climate resilience, DEI issues, Public access/recreation, employment opportunities, etc.)

Are there (or could there be) other organizations or individuals that support the project primarily for the non- salmon benefits described above?

Is there an identified project sponsor? If so, who is it? If not, who or what entity might be a likely candidate? What stage is the project in? (Feasibility? Design? Acquisition? Construction?)

How much funding is needed for each phase of work?

Is there an existing strategy for securing funding for this work? Is the project ready to proceed with the next phase of work?

If funding is in hand, what is the timeframe for implementation? Are there factors that make this project particularly time-sensitive? Other relevant information:

Legacy Projects for salmon West Sound Lead Entity

Potential Sponsor

Purdy Creek at 144th

Pierce County

Burley Creek Fish Barriers

Kitsap County / K Conservation Dist.

Navy RR culverts (Esp Dickerson)

Navy

Harper Culvert

Kitsap County

Point No Point estuary

Mid Sound FEG/Kitsap County

Newberry Road culvert

Kitsap County

Chico Corridor protection/acquisition

Kitsap County/Suquamish Tribe/GPC

Northlake Way

City of Bremerton

Navy Barrier Embayments

Navy

Gorst Creek Cooridor

Bremerton/Port of Bremerton/ WSDOT

Evergreen Park Shoreline Restoration

City of Bremerton

Blakely Harbor restoration

Bainbridge Island

Description- salmon habitat uplift

Non-salmon benefits

gas station at mouth of creek causes fish

passage and pollution

shellfish beds

various culvert and floodplain issues

shellfish beds

railroad trestles intersect streams

cause fish passage barrier

flood & sediment control

36″ culvert at Olympiad Drive

shoreline restoration

barrier estuary restoration

marine intertidal species

fish passage Hood Canal stream

flood & sediment control

contstricted floodplain upstream of Chico Way

flood & sediment control

Fish passage – Kitsap Creek downstream from lake

flood & sediment control

barrier estuary restoration -Keyport, Clam Bay

marine intertidal species

Gorst Creek floodplain and estuary constriction

multiple human & ecological

shoreline restoration forage fish and salmon use

marine intertidal species

contricted intertidal habitat

marine intertidal species

Current stage

feasibility

concept only, USACOE 206 study proposal

conceptual only, some contact with US Navy via PSP

100% designed

feasibility

conceptual

conceptual, part of 2004 Chico plan

preliminary design completed

conceptual, some feasibiltiy reveals contamination issues

conceptual

100% designed

conceptual

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Puget Sound Partnership

Legacy Project Portfolio Call for Projects Project Information Form

STATE OF WASHINGTON

Project name:

Minter Cr at SW

Pine Rd Culvert

PRISM Number(s) (if known):

Submitting Lead Entity:

WSPER

Project Sponsor (if known):

Kitsap County Public

Works

Submitted by:

Joe Rutan, PE

Email:

[email protected]

BRIEF Overall Project Summary and location description:

Replace fish barrier 54-inch culvert conveying Minter Creek beneath SW Pine Road with fish passable structure.

Does this project address a high priority barrier to salmon recovery? If so, please point to where this priority is identified and link to the priorities identified in your local or regional salmon recovery chapter or support for a species of tribal significance.

WDFW list this culvert as 33% passable for salmon. Total passage summary report at http://apps.wdfw.wa.gov/fishpassagephotos/Reports/105%20K050416b_Report.pdf

Does this project exceed the cost of a typical PSAR large cap project request? What is the estimated total cost of the project?

Overall project cost approximately $2,400,000.

What are the additional (non-salmon) benefits of this project? (Climate resilience, DEI issues, Public access/recreation, employment opportunities, etc.)

This culvert is in poor condition and must be replaced to continue to support the road above it. SW Pine Road is an East-West Arterial in Kitsap County. SW Pine Road serves access to Horseshoe Lake Park and Horseshoe Lake Golf course.

Are there (or could there be) other organizations or individuals that support the project primarily for the non- salmon benefits described above?

Road users

Is there an identified project sponsor? If so, who is it? If not, who or what entity might be a likely candidate?

Kitsap County Public Works

What stage is the project in? (Feasibility? Design? Acquisition? Construction?)

Design 2023, Acquisition 2023, Construction 2024 How much funding is needed for each phase of work? Construction Funding of $2,400,000 requested

Puget Sound Mega Projects List July 29, 2021

Page 2

Is there an existing strategy for securing funding for this work?

Seek grant sources to accomplish

Is the project ready to proceed with the next phase of work?

Yes

If funding is in hand, what is the timeframe for implementation?

Construction in 2024

Are there factors that make this project particularly time-sensitive? Deteriorating existing culvert. This culvert serves the Mintercreek watershed. Other relevant information:

Project name:

Evergreen Park Shoreline

Restoration

PRISM Number(s) (if known):

18-1303

14-1927

Submitting Lead Entity:

WSPER

Project Sponsor (if known):

City of Bremerton

Submitted by:

K peters

Email: [email protected]

BRIEF Overall Project Summary and location description:

To be filled out later

Does this project address a high priority barrier to salmon recovery? If so, please point to where this priority is identified and link to the priorities identified in your local or regional salmon recovery chapter or support for a species of tribal significance.

Does this project exceed the cost of a typical PSAR large cap project request? What is the estimated total cost of the project?

What are the additional (non-salmon) benefits of this project? (Climate resilience, DEI issues, Public access/recreation, employment opportunities, etc.)

Are there (or could there be) other organizations or individuals that support the project primarily for the non- salmon benefits described above?

Is there an identified project sponsor? If so, who is it? If not, who or what entity might be a likely candidate? What stage is the project in? (Feasibility? Design? Acquisition? Construction?)

How much funding is needed for each phase of work?

Is there an existing strategy for securing funding for this work? Is the project ready to proceed with the next phase of work?

If funding is in hand, what is the timeframe for implementation? Are there factors that make this project particularly time-sensitive? Other relevant information:

Project name:

US Navy railroad

culverts

PRISM Number(s) (if known):

Submitting Lead Entity:

WSPER

Project Sponsor (if known):

US Navy/Suquamish

Tribe

Submitted by:

K peters

Email: [email protected]

BRIEF Overall Project Summary and location description:

To be filled out later

Does this project address a high priority barrier to salmon recovery? If so, please point to where this priority is identified and link to the priorities identified in your local or regional salmon recovery chapter or support for a species of tribal significance.

Does this project exceed the cost of a typical PSAR large cap project request? What is the estimated total cost of the project?

What are the additional (non-salmon) benefits of this project? (Climate resilience, DEI issues, Public access/recreation, employment opportunities, etc.)

Are there (or could there be) other organizations or individuals that support the project primarily for the non- salmon benefits described above?

Is there an identified project sponsor? If so, who is it? If not, who or what entity might be a likely candidate? What stage is the project in? (Feasibility? Design? Acquisition? Construction?)

How much funding is needed for each phase of work?

Is there an existing strategy for securing funding for this work? Is the project ready to proceed with the next phase of work?

If funding is in hand, what is the timeframe for implementation? Are there factors that make this project particularly time-sensitive? Other relevant information:

Project name:

Pt no Pt estuary restoration

PRISM Number(s) (if known):

21-1053

20-1524

18-2076

Submitting Lead Entity:

WSPER

Project Sponsor (if known):

Mid Sound FEG

Submitted by:

K peters

Email: [email protected]

BRIEF Overall Project Summary and location description:

To be filled out later

Does this project address a high priority barrier to salmon recovery? If so, please point to where this priority is identified and link to the priorities identified in your local or regional salmon recovery chapter or support for a species of tribal significance.

Does this project exceed the cost of a typical PSAR large cap project request? What is the estimated total cost of the project?

What are the additional (non-salmon) benefits of this project? (Climate resilience, DEI issues, Public access/recreation, employment opportunities, etc.)

Are there (or could there be) other organizations or individuals that support the project primarily for the non- salmon benefits described above?

Is there an identified project sponsor? If so, who is it? If not, who or what entity might be a likely candidate? What stage is the project in? (Feasibility? Design? Acquisition? Construction?)

How much funding is needed for each phase of work?

Is there an existing strategy for securing funding for this work? Is the project ready to proceed with the next phase of work?

If funding is in hand, what is the timeframe for implementation? Are there factors that make this project particularly time-sensitive? Other relevant information:

Project name:

Purdy Creek at 144th St NW Acquisition/Fish

Passage

PRISM Number(s) (if known):

14-2176 Plan, Lower Purdy Creek Restoration Feasibility

Submitting Lead Entity:

WSPER

Project Sponsor (if known):

Pierce County SWM

Submitted by:

Marty Ereth

Email:

[email protected]

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BRIEF Overall Project Summary and location description:

This fish passage culvert replacement project is addressing a partial barrier to fish migration and an ongoing pollution threat in the Purdy Creek watershed that drains into Henderson Bay in South Puget Sound. The barrier is located at the head end of tidewater and is co-owned with a private business (Chevron franchisee). The project includes acquisition and demolition of a gas station that lacks stormwater controls, fill removal and potential environmental remediation and construction of a new crossing at 144th. In 2018 Pierce County completed a Restoration Feasibility Study and alternatives analysis. The preferred alternative is to construct a bridge at 144th St NW, purchase and remove the existing gas station and daylight and restore over 200 feet of stream channel. WSDOT’s SR302 crossing, a partial barrier is located at tidewater only 330 feet downstream. WSDOT’s SR16 is located 0.65 miles upstream and is also a partial barrier. WSDOT designs are complete, and they are in permitting now with construction scheduled for 2022-23 under one contract ($25 -$30 million). Modeling the SR302 replacement, WSDOT found with the larger opening, there may be a 1.5 ft. head cut (channel incision) that propagates upstream to the 144th outfall, making the partial barrier a complete barrier to salmon.

The project will have immediate benefits of providing unimpeded passage of ESA listed Chinook and steelhead, fall chum, coho and coastal cutthroat to more than 7 miles of Purdy Creek and tributaries upstream. The project also solves a current and future water quality threat. The project benefits from, and leverages WSDOT’s proposed fish passage projects at SR-302 and SR-16 planned for 2022-23 construction. The project also builds off other work in the watershed including a 2011 Family Forest Fish Passage Program (FFFPP) fish passage project immediately upstream of SR-16, Pierce County fish passage design at 160th (county line) and riparian plantings completed by the Kitsap Conservation District with private landowners in the upper portion of Purdy Creek within Kitsap County.

fall making fish passage at the County culvert worse so it’s critical to address this barrier at this time.

Does this project address a high priority barrier to salmon recovery? If so, please point to where this priority is identified and link to the priorities identified in your local or regional salmon recovery chapter or support for a species of tribal significance.

Yes. The project addresses a high priority barrier in Purdy Creek and within the Key Peninsula basin. The project

Does this project exceed the cost of a typical PSAR large cap project request? No but the project cost exceeds the amount allotted to the WSPER group annually. What is the estimated total cost of the project?

$4 – $7 Million

What are the additional (non-salmon) benefits of this project? (Climate resilience, DEI issues, Public access/recreation, employment opportunities, etc.)

The project also solves a current and future water quality threat due to a gas station and fill placed on top of the lower portion of the shared culvert. There are no current stormwater controls or BMP’s provided.

All of the contaminated runoff from the Chevron station is directed to a manhole and directly discharged into Purdy Creek.

Are there (or could there be) other organizations or individuals that support the project primarily for the non- salmon benefits described above?

Yes. The greater community of Purdy, Wauna, Burly and Gig Harbor will benefit from a healthier watershed, estuary and marine area.

Is there an identified project sponsor? If so, who is it? If not, who or what entity might be a likely candidate?

Yes. Pierce County SWM would be the likely sponsor.

What stage is the project in? (Feasibility? Design? Acquisition? Construction?)

A feasibility study was completed with GeoEngineers in 2018 and funded by SRFB. The next phase of the project should be environmental assessment for containments. acquisition and demolition. The project can then go into scoping, design, permitting and construction.

How much funding is needed for each phase of work?

There are unknowns since the Chevron Corporation apparently has first rights of refusal for purchase

An engineer’s estimate is included in this form below.

Purchase/acquisition of gas station –

$1,200,000

Geotechnical investigation –

$ 55,000

Design –

$ 132,000

Permitting –

$ 50,000

Construction management –

$ 66,000

Remediation –

$ 300,000

Construction –

$2, 278,650

TOTAL

$ 4,081,650

Is there an existing strategy for securing funding for this work?

Not at this time.

Is the project ready to proceed with the next phase of work?

Negotiations with the Chevron gas station owner/ franchisee need to occur. The owner informed us in 2018 that they are not interested in selling at the time and that Chevron has first rights of refusal if a sale occurs.

If funding is in hand, what is the timeframe for implementation?

No funding is not in hand. Pierce County’s Capital Facilities Plan has identified $50K in 2022 and 70K in 2023 for preliminary and final engineering, $1 million for acquisition in 2023, and $3 million in 2025, $1 million in 2026 and 1 million in 2027 for construction. The funds have not been allocated. WSDOT is scheduled to replace injunction barriers upstream and downstream in 2022/2023 making the project time sensitive.

image Are there factors that make this project particularly time-sensitive?

Yes. WSDOT is moving forward with replacement of their SR302 injunction barrier located 300 feet downstream at tidewater. The replacement was modeled to potentially headcut upstream to the 144th outfall creating a 1.5-foot head cut and making the 33% passable partial barrier a complete barrier and blocking all salmonid access to the upper 7 miles habitat.

Additionally, WSDOT is replacing a 2nd injunction barrier culvert on Purdy Creek upstream 0.5 miles at SR16. Both the SR302 and SR16 projects are in permitting and expect to go to construction in 2022 and 2023.

Other relevant information:

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Figure 1 Culvert outfall in WSDOT’s SR302 right of way

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Figure 2 Culvert inlet

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Figure 3 Inside box culvert under gas station (County culverts transition into private box culvert)

Fish Passage and Restoration Efforts in the Watershed

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Engineers Estimate

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Legacy Project Portfolio Call for Projects Project Information Form

Project name:

Ruby Cr at Glenwood Road

SW Culvert

PRISM Number(s) (if known):

Submitting Lead Entity:

WSPER

Project Sponsor (if known):

Kitsap County Public

Works

Submitted by:

Joe Rutan, PE

Email:

[email protected]

BRIEF Overall Project Summary and location description:

Replace fish barrier 36-inch culvert conveying Ruby Creek beneath Glenwood Road SW Road with fish passable structure.

Does this project address a high priority barrier to salmon recovery? If so, please point to where this priority is identified and link to the priorities identified in your local or regional salmon recovery chapter or support for a species of tribal significance.

WDFW list this culvert as a 33% blockage for salmon. Total passage summary report at http://apps.wdfw.wa.gov/fishpassagephotos/Reports/1320083_Report.pdf

Does this project exceed the cost of a typical PSAR large cap project request? What is the estimated total cost of the project?

Overall project cost approximately $1,000,000.

What are the additional (non-salmon) benefits of this project? (Climate resilience, DEI issues, Public access/recreation, employment opportunities, etc.)

Glenwood Road SW is a secondary route to Sidney Glenwood Elementary School. It is an alternate route for SW Sidney Road and to the business’s on Sidney Road.

Are there (or could there be) other organizations or individuals that support the project primarily for the non- salmon benefits described above?

Road users

Is there an identified project sponsor? If so, who is it? If not, who or what entity might be a likely candidate?

Kitsap County Public Works

What stage is the project in? (Feasibility? Design? Acquisition? Construction?)

Design 2023, Acquisition 2023, Construction 2024

How much funding is needed for each phase of work?

Construction Funding of $1,000,000 requested

Is there an existing strategy for securing funding for this work?

Seek grant sources to accomplish

Is the project ready to proceed with the next phase of work?

Yes

If funding is in hand, what is the timeframe for implementation?

Construction in 2024

Are there factors that make this project particularly time-sensitive?

This culvert is a tributary to Blackjack Creek which is a priority for the Suquamish Tribe.

Other relevant information:

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Legacy Project Portfolio Call for Projects Project Information Form

Project name:

Strawberry Cr at

Silverdale Way

PRISM Number(s) (if known):

Submitting Lead Entity:

WSPER

Project Sponsor (if known):

Kitsap County Public

Works

Submitted by:

Joe Rutan, PE

Email:

[email protected]

BRIEF Overall Project Summary and location description:

Replace fish barrier 72-inch culvert conveying Strawberry Creek beneath Silverdale Way.

Does this project address a high priority barrier to salmon recovery? If so, please point to where this priority is identified and link to the priorities identified in your local or regional salmon recovery chapter or support for a species of tribal significance.

Total passage summary report at http://apps.wdfw.wa.gov/fishpassagephotos/Reports/15.0246%20%20%200.15_Report.pdf

Does this project exceed the cost of a typical PSAR large cap project request? What is the estimated total cost of the project?

Overall project cost approximately $4,500,000.

What are the additional (non-salmon) benefits of this project? (Climate resilience, DEI issues, Public access/recreation, employment opportunities, etc.)

This culvert needs to be replaced for the future traffic capacity.

Are there (or could there be) other organizations or individuals that support the project primarily for the non- salmon benefits described above?

Silverdale is a major business area for Kitsap County. Schools, business and Road users will benefit from the improvement.

Is there an identified project sponsor? If so, who is it? If not, who or what entity might be a likely candidate?

Kitsap County Public Works

What stage is the project in? (Feasibility? Design? Acquisition? Construction?)

Design 2024, Acquisition 2024, Construction 2025 How much funding is needed for each phase of work? Construction Funding of $4,500,000 requested

Is there an existing strategy for securing funding for this work?

Seek grant sources to accomplish

Is the project ready to proceed with the next phase of work?

Yes

If funding is in hand, what is the timeframe for implementation?

Construction in 2025

Are there factors that make this project particularly time-sensitive?

This location is part of the Strawberry Creek watershed and replacing this culvert will allow upstream barriers to be improved.

Other relevant information: